Inter Derby

World Wide Derby Domination

Long Island Roller Rebel’s Derby 101

Roller Derby 101 – Derby Training Manual

 

Warmups

2

2Basic Clockwise/Counter Clockwise Skating

 

Brisk Walking

 

Sun Worship Sequence

 

Upper Body Stretches

 

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Triceps pulled across the chest

 

Triceps pulled over the head

 

Neck Stretch

 

Cobra

 

2 2 2 2Lower Body Stretches

 

2Hamstring

 

IT Band

 

Bent Leg Butt Stretch

 

Bridge Quad and Torso Reach

 

Seated Twist

 

Laying Torso Twist

 

Inner Thigh (“Badapple”)

 

Squats

 

2 2 2 2 2 2 2Strength/Power

2

2Basic Squat Form

 

Variations

 

Alternating Lunge Steps

 

2 2 2Floor Work

 

2Straight leg raises

 

Side Leg Raises

 

Inner Side Leg Raises

 

Side Leg Raises

 

Bridge Kicks (Doggie Style Kicks)

 

Quad/Butt Lifts

 

Minute of Death

 

Situps

 

Reverse Crunches

 

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2Partner/Skating Power Drills

 

2Wheelbarrow Pushes

 

Starts

 

2Balance

2

2One Leg Glide

 

Duck Walk Start

 

Toe Stop Run

 

2 2 2Stops

 

2T-Stop

 

Plow Stop

 

Toe Stop

 

Hockey Stop

 

2 2 2 2Weave Drills

 

2Eggshells/Figure Eights

 

One Leg Eggshells/Figure Eights

 

Wide Weave

 

Quick Weave

 

Scissors

 

Weaving With Cones/Obstacles

 

2 2 2 2 2 2Moving Balance Drills

 

2One Leg Laps

 

Skating Backwards

 

Figure Eight Balance

 

2 2 2Crossovers

 

2Standing Crossovers

 

Grapevines

 

Normal Skating Crossovers

 

Corner Crossover Balancing

 

Alternating Crossover Steps

 

Figure Eight Corners

 

Backwards Crossovers

 

2 2 2 2 2 2 2Turning

 

2180 Degree Turn – Front to Back

 

360 Degree Turn – Front to front

 

Advanced Variations

 

Backwards Toe Stop

 

Whistle Turns

 

Quick Steps

 

2 2 2 2 2Quickness/Agility

2

2Tiny Steps

 

Side Steps

 

Side Step Ball Pass

 

Texas Two-Step

 

2 2 2 2Jumping

 

2Basic Two Leg Hop

 

Basic One Leg Leap

 

Short Distance

 

2 2Endurance

2

2Pyramid Sprints

 

Interval Sprints

 

2 2Long Distance

 

2Pacelines

 

2Speed Changeups

 

280% vs. 100% Changeup

 

Pack Rotation

 

2 2Combined Skill Endurance Drills

 

2Whistle Falls/Sprints

 

Suicide Sprints

 

Basic Falls

 

2 2Falls

2

2One Knee Fall

 

Two Knee Fall

 

Four Point Fall

 

Blocking – Basic to Advanced

 

2 2 2Blocking

2

2Booty Block

 

Shoulder Block/Body Check

 

Body/Continual Push

 

Elbow Block

 

Basic Whips

 

2 2 2 2Assists

2

2Classic Whip

 

Turnstile Whip

 

Underhand Whip

 

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2Basic Push

 

2Pushes

 

2Group/Partner Assist Drills

 

2Group Whip Relay

 

Whippers/Whip-ees – Group Version

 

Whippers/Whip-ees – Partner Version

 

Jamming Drills

 

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Various Derby Skills

2

2Skating the Track

 

2Blocking Drills

 

2Eye Contact

 

Identifying Your Jammer

 

Pack Skating

 

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Misc. Drills

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Eyes Closed Partner Lead

 

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Blood and Thunder

 

Shark Tank

 

Dodge Ball

 

Capture the Flag

 

Red Light Green Light

 

Freeze Tag

 

Group Relays

 

2 2 2 2 2 2 2Obstacle Course Ideas

 

2Slalom Cones

 

Falls in Designated Location

 

Tight Square Options

 

Jumping

 

Limbo

 

Speed

 

2 2 2 2 2Skills Tests and Benchmarks

2

2Six Lap Time Trials

 

Two Minute Distance

 

2 2Stopping

 

2On a Dime

 

Timed Stop

 

2 2Skills/Balance

 

2Turns

 

Falls

 

Texas Two Step/Leaping Around Rink

 

Cone Slalom

 

Suicides

 

2 2 2 2 2Blocking

 

2One on One

 

Focus on Basic Skills

 

2Sample Practice Drill Lineups

2

2Lineup 1 – Basics

 

Lineup 2 – Balancing (A)

 

Lineup 3 – Explosive Power

 

Lineup 4 – Beginning Endurance

 

Lineup 5 – Balance (B)

 

Lineup 5 – Assists and Teamwork

 

2 2 2 2 2 2Focus on Endurance, Quickness and Agility

 

2Lineup 1 – Foundations

 

Lineup 2 – Challenge Each other (endurance and communication)

 

Lineup 3 – Strength

 

Lineup 4 –Power

 

Lineup 4 – Agility

 

Lineup 5 – Game Skills (A)

 

Lineup 6 – Alertness

 

2 2 2 2 2 2Warmups

In general, warm-ups should be 5-10 minutes of light skating, brisk walking, jumping rope or the like. You should be able to carry on a conversation without difficulty, but should break a sweat. This insures that the blood is pumping through your muscles and readies them for initial stretching. No abrupt or jolting moves should be done in warm-ups as this risks injury. Warm up skating is done before stretching.

Basic Clockwise/Counter Clockwise Skating

10 minutes of skating alternating between clockwise and counter clockwise every 2 minutes.

Games

 

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Stretches

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Jogging

If you are working in land drills to open practice, 5-10 mins of jogging will be enough before stretching.

 

Stretches

In general, stretches are most beneficial when done for 3 sets of constant 30 seconds each. Do not bounce – this increases risk of injury. Also keep in mind that form is better than reach – make sure the stretch is in perfect form before pushing it farther.

 

Upper Body Stretches

Triceps pulled across the chest

Reach out your right arm in front of you. Swing it across your chest and hold in place with other arm for 30 seconds. Be careful not to hunch shoulders or neck. Repeat with the left arm.

Triceps pulled over the head

Reach out your right arm up to the sky. Bend your elbow so that your hand is by your neck. Use your other arm to pull your tricep for a good stretch. Again – be careful not to hunch shoulders or neck. Repeat with left arm.

Neck Stretch

Reach out your right arm out to the floor, but a little way away from your torso. Tilt your head to the left to feel the pull across the neck and right shoulder. To intensify this stretch, reach out to the floor more with your hand or add a head nod (front/back). Hold for 30 seconds. Repeat with left side.

Cobra

Lay on your stomach with your arms in a pushup position. Push up so that your hands support your upper torso and look towards the ceiling. Hold for 30 seconds. Turn your head right and left looking back at your feet to increase the stretch.

 

Lower Body Stretches

Hamstring

Lay on your back and kick one leg up to the ceiling, leaving he other leg bent with the knee to the ceiling. Use a strap (or the laces of your skates) to hold onto your foot and straighten the uplifted leg. Get the leg as straight as possible before pulling your foot closer to your head. Hold for 30 seconds, repeat 3x before moving onto the other leg. Use in conjunction with the Hamstring stretch outlined above, alternating Hamstring/IT Band on the same leg until 3 reps of each are done – then move onto the other leg.

IT Band

Lay on your back and kick your right leg up to the ceiling, leaving he other leg bent with the knee to the ceiling. Use a strap (or the laces of your skates) to hold onto your foot and straighten the uplifted leg. With your left hand, pull the strap across your body so that your foot is closer to the floor on the left side of your body. Hold for 30 seconds, repeat 3x before moving onto the other leg. Use in conjunction with the Hamstring stretch outlined above, alternating Hamstring/IT Band on the same leg until 3 reps of each are done – then move onto the other leg.

Bent Leg Butt Stretch

Lay on your back and kick your right leg up to the ceiling. Bend your left leg across your body. Use a strap (or the laces of your skates) to hold onto your foot and straighten the uplifted leg. With your left hand, pull the strap across your body so that your foot is closer to the floor on the left side of your body. Hold for 30 seconds, repeat 3x before moving onto the other leg. Use in conjunction with the Hamstring stretch outlined above, alternating Hamstring/IT Band on the same leg until 3 reps of each are done – then move onto the other leg.

 

This move can also be done sitting upright on the ground, one leg out straight on the floor, the other folded over the straight leg and leaning the torso over the legs. Reach for your feet, using the strap if necessary or to intensify the stretch.

Bridge Quad and Torso Reach

Sit on your knees and reach your right hand behind you. Drop down till your right elbow supports your upper body and your torso forms a bridge-like shape. Reach your left arm up over your head and look at the floor on the right side of you. Hold this pose for 30 seconds. Then switch your gaze to the ceiling, so that the stretch migrates a little. Hold this for 30 seconds, and then repeat on the other side.

Seated Twist

Sit straight up with your right leg out straight and the left knee bent up toward the ceiling. Place the left foot on the other side of your right thigh and use it as leverage to twist your torso to the left. Repeat with the other side.

Laying Torso Twist

Lie on your back and pull your knees up to your chest. Let them fall over to one side to the floor, and reach your arms out to the other side. Hold for 30 seconds, and repeat on the other side.

Inner Thigh

Start on your hands and knees. Let your legs flatten so your pelvis is closer to the floor and your feet are out (like a frog). Concentrate on getting a stretch in your inner thigh – don’t bounce. Although bouncing looks super hot, it’s an injury risk and should be avoided.

Strength/Power

Before blocking and high contact moves are performed, you must make sure that there is enough muscle mass around joints and bones to support heavy body checks and potentially dangerous falls. Below are some strength exercises to build muscle mass, which will protect you and help build power and speed in your stride.

Squats

All squats can be done on skates as well as off. Change up your routine to keep from getting bored. They can also be done standing still or skating around the rink.

Basic Squat Form

Stand with legs shoulder width apart. With your weight evenly distributed on your feet, squat down with your back straight as if you were holding yourself over a nasty toilet. Slowly raise up, making sure your knees never bend past your toes.

For the basic move, aim for 3 sets of 15 squats with excellent form – a set done with good form will do you more good than 10 sets that are sloppy.

Variations

Be sure to change up the way you do this move by incorporating different variations such as:

Quick reps (but slow enough to keep good form)

Slow reps

Deep/Shallow/Deep pyramid working each section to exhaustion before moving up/down again

One legged – work both right and left legs

Try adding in leg kicks with the non-supporting leg – use all directions similar to ballet warm-ups: forward, backwards and out to the side

Alternating Lunge Steps

While skating around the track, at the blow of a whistle, start using each leg as if taking a large step. Continue while moving around the rink until the whistle is blown again. Normally this is done at 30 second intervals with brisk skating in between. Also can alternate with sets of squats.

Floor Work

Straight leg raises

Lay on your back with one knee bent, and the other out straight. Lift the straight leg to the ceiling. Repeat 3 sets of 15 reps, adding weight when a greater challenge is needed.

Side Leg Raises

Lay on your side, and bend the knee of the leg closest to the floor. Keep the other leg out straight and lift up towards the ceiling. Repeat 3 sets of 15 reps, adding weight when a greater challenge is needed.

Inner Side Leg Raises

Lay on your side, and bend the knee of the leg closest to the ceiling so that your foot is on the ground and the knee points up to the ceiling. Keep the other leg out straight and lift up towards the ceiling. Repeat 3 sets of 15 reps, adding weight when a greater challenge is needed.

Side Leg Raises

Lay on your side, and bend the knee of the leg closest to the floor, and the other out straight. Lift the straight leg to the ceiling. Repeat 3 sets of 15 reps, adding weight when a greater challenge is needed.

Bridge Kicks (Doggie Style Kicks)

Get down on all fours – beginners support yourself with your hands, while more advanced girls support yourself on your elbows. Straighten the right leg out so that your toe touches the floor. Lift that foot up to the ceiling and back down again – repeat 30 kicks before switching to the other leg. Many variations can be used in any desired sequence, and include:

Kick out to the side with a flexed foot

Bend the knee so that the sole of the foot is facing the ceiling. The foot remains flat to the ceiling while you pump the leg up and down, doing 30 reps on each side.

Bend the knee and lift the leg out to the side (doggie pee style)

Quad/Butt Lifts

With skates on, this becomes a much more intense exercise of deep muscle control. Beginners start without skates and add them in when you feel more confident.

Lay on your back with both feet (all wheels) flat on the floor and knees pointing up. Lift your butt off the floor so that your lower back comes off the floor and your upper back and shoulders support your weight. Slowly release down so that your back is flat on the floor again. Repeat 3 sets of 15 reps on each side.

Minute of Death

This is similar to the Plank pose in Yoga, but keep your skates on. Get in a pushup position, only instead of your hands supporting your weight, use your elbows and forearms (forming a triangle with the point at your hands). With your weight on your elbows and your toes/toe stops, lift your legs and torso so that your body forms a flat “plank” pose. Hold this position for 1 minute – repeat up to 3 times if possible. Be sure not to let your torso/butt/knees sag to the ground or point up to the ceiling – keep as level as possible.

Situps

There are many variations – below are just some of the options. Whatever you do, try and do them till the point of exhaustion for the muscle group. All sets should start with 3 sets of 15 reps. Add more reps or add additional variations to the sequence to increase workout. In any trunk exercise, you will get the most out of it if you take a half second to tighten up that muscle group before the actual movement occurs. This prep keeps you focused, regulates your breathing and and keeps your mind off how much you hate the exercise.

Lay on your back with your feet on the floor and your knees pointing towards the ceiling. Hold your arms up and out, palms down, fingers pointing to the ceiling. Reach up, bringing your shoulder blades off the ground and bring it back to neutral.

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Next, do a set with your arms straight out facing up like before, but this time pull them down closer to your knees for a mid-level crunch.

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Do a set with your arms down reaching through your legs toward your feet.

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Raise your right leg and rest your ankle across your other knee. Place your left hand out on the floor for balance. Put the other hand behind your head and (leading with your shoulder – not your elbow) crunch across to the raised knee. Switch sides.

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Do a set with your arms behind your head crunching your upper torso towards your knees

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make sure to lead with your shoulders, not your elbows

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relax your neck so that all work is coming from your abs 

Reverse Crunches

Reverse crunches are done from the same position as a traditional situp/crunch, but instead of bringing your upper torso up, these involve the lower abs lifting your butt (and legs) off the floor.

Lay flat on the floor with legs out long. Raise the legs up so that the soles of your feet are facing the ceiling. Keep the feet up in the air pump the legs up and down (from the lower torso), keeping them as straight as possible

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Make sure your feet are flexed to get the most out of this exercise.

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The movement is very small – concentrate on squeezing your trunk supporters and getting that butt off the floor.A variation to the above – have a partner standing over your head (facing your feet). Lay flat with your feet out long. Keeping your legs straight, raise them up to meet the hands of your partner who then pushes them back towards the floor. Don’t let them hit the floor, but raise them back up to your partner’s hands. Start with 3 sets of 15. Try them fast to harness the explosive potential of your torso that you will need in games.

 

Introverted Push Ups

Lay on the ground with your face towards the floor. Start off each push up by using your toe stops to hold up your legs and your arms to hold up your upper body. Counting to ten, slowly lower your body to the floor. Each count to ten is one push up.

 

Tri Push Ups

Lay on the ground with your face towards the floor. Place your hands in front of you so your index fingers and your thumbs form a diamond shape on the floor. Push your self off the ground without lifting the lower half of your body, do this 8 times. Move your arms out to your sides with hands facing inwards and push your self off the grounds, do this 8 times as well. When finished turn your hands to face straight, not outwards, and push yourself off the ground, also do this 8 times. Do each set 8 times, than 6 times, than 3 times and than 2 times. Do not stop in between sets and never lift your lower half off the ground,

 

Partner/Skating Power Drills

Wheelbarrow Pushes

Partner up and take turns pushing each other around the rink. Push your partner for about 2 minutes each and than switch. Be sure to stay low in your knees and take long, powerful strides.

 

Pulls

With a partner, take turns pulling each other around the rink. Pull your partner for about two minutes and than switch. Be sure to stay low to work on muscle strength and balance.

 

Group Pulls/Pushes

In groups of 6 or less take turns pulling or pushing the entire group. Each girl lines up behind another and the girl in the front of the group pulls the entire line around the length of the track. Do this for one minute and than the girl in the front of the line moves to the back and the next girl will pull the line for 1 minute. Do this with pushes also, only the girl will be moving to the front of the pack when her turn is done.

 

Jammers Double Up

While doing speed drills, endurance or strengthening drills, have the jammers perform each drill twice.

Balance

Any time spent on skates will help with balance, but these moves make you aware of your center of gravity so that you can improve blocking and jamming alike.

Starts

Start skaters out in groups so that they can get a feel for starting each different way. Rotate the groups around for one lap each, then the next group goes. With a good rhythm (and a small enough group) this can be a great exercise for working anaerobic fitness (short bursts of energy) as well.

One Leg Glide

Start with one foot pointed forward, and the other behind it at a 20 degree angle (like 3rd position in ballet). Use the back leg to push off and glide as far as possible on that one push. Get as much power from that push as you can. Repeat on the other side, pushing yourself to go farther and faster with each push. When skating normally, remember to get as much out of each stride as possible.

Duck Walk Start

Stand with skates shoulder width apart. Turn your toes so that one faces two o-clock and the other ten o-clock in relation to your hips (facing high noon). Start steps forward, keeping your feet pointed out like a duck. The power in this start comes from the push you get from the lateral position of your feet in relation to your direction of movement.

Toe Stop Run

From a dead stop, start walking (and slowly work up to being able to run) on your toe stops. Your wheels should not touch the ground. Do 2-5 toestop steps before returning to a “normal” skating stride to get the most out of this explosive start. Duck walk steps following those first toe stop steps can also further your initial speed.

 

Cannonball/Shoot the duck

Get down so that your butt is next to your skates. Then, pull your leg out and hold it with your hands. Skate as far as you can in this position.

 

Stops

T-Stop

Start by skating at a semi-slow pace. When you are ready, return your skates to parallel and glide for a moment to re-center yourself. Then take your left (or right) foot and place all four wheels on the ground behind your right skate so that it is parallel to the other foot. It forms a T. Use your inner thigh and your calf muscles to drag the foot into the ground so that you stop instead of spinning around.

Make sure your focus is up in front of you and not on the floor

Hold your arms out to your sides like a ballerina

Instead of thinking bringing the foot up into the heel of your front skate, think of bending your knees and pulling it into the floor.

Make sure all 4 wheels are dragging on the ground, or concentrate on getting the back 2 wheels to take the brunt of the pressure. Using only the front (inside) wheels causes spinouts and risks injury.

Don’t forget to try the other side.

Make sure your knees are bent – straight legs will cause twisting and less power.

As you get comfortable, increase your speed and the distance in which you allow yourself to stop.

 

People who have skied will most quickly understand this stop. Start by skating at a semi-slow pace. When you are ready, return your skates to a wide parallel stance and glide for a moment to re-center yourself. Point your toes into each other like a pigeon. Your knees should be very bent, and your butt in a deep squat position.

Don’t let your skates touch each other in the front or you will trip. The trick to this stop is getting low and really squeezing your butt and quads.

As you get comfortable, increase your speed and the distance in which you allow yourself to stop.

This is also an effective way to slow yourself down in the pack once you have mastered it.

Toe Stop

Start by skating at a semi-slow pace. When you are ready, return your skates to a wide parallel stance and glide for a moment to re-center yourself. Take one skate and drag your toestop on the ground behind you until you come to a stop.

See Turning section for more on another stop that incorporates toe stops and a turn backwards. Master the basics before moving on to this turning toe stop.

Hockey Stop

This is an advanced stop and shouldn’t be attempted until all the other stops are mastered. It is very hard to accomplish on the semi-softer speed wheels (hyper witch doctors). Skating at a moderate pace, return your skates to a “neutral” (shoulders over wheels) stance and glide a moment to get your balance. In one move, shift your weight slightly to your toe (front) wheels and pivot your back wheels forward from the side. Dig your back wheels into the floor

 

Weave Drills

There are many ways to incorporate the movement of weight from one side to the other, as well as over outside vs. inside wheels. Below are just some examples. Mix them up to avoid boredom.

Eggshells/Figure Eights

Stand with your feet a little bigger than shoulder width apart. Keeping both skates on the floor, weave your skates in and out so that the line on the ground forms an hourglass shape (like in and out of a Plow Stop).

Make them as wide as possible to really work the muscles in your legs, even if it slows you down at first.

Eventually, the more power you give to the curves, the faster you can go.

If you are having problems, concentrate on moving your weight from the inside of your skate wheels to the outside and back.

Go back and forth from one end of the rink to the other.

Make sure the trucks of your skates have been loosened, as it will greatly help in your ability to maneuver in this drill.

One Leg Eggshells/Figure Eights

Stand with your feet a little bigger than shoulder width apart. Keeping both skates on the floor, weave your right skate in and out like in standard 2 leg eggshells. All the power of your propulsion comes from that one leg. The more power you give to the curves, the faster you can go.

Make them as wide as possible to really work the muscles in your legs.

Go back and forth from one end of the rink to the other.

Don’t forget to switch to the left leg.

Make sure the trucks of your skates have been loosened, as it will greatly help in your ability to maneuver in this drill.

If you are having problems, concentrate on moving your weight from the inside of your skate wheels to the outside and back.

Wide Weave

Building on the skills from the 2 and 1 legged eggshells, exaggerate the weaving pattern a step further and weave back and forth as if you are slaloming down a mountain on skis. Make the weave wide.

Add turns to look behind you as your body pivots with the weight transfer

Quick Weave

Do the one legged eggshell exercise, but instead of making them wide, concentrate on quick fast back and forth movements. Remember not to pick up your feet.

Partner up and switch off being jammer and blocker – use the quick transfer of weight to fake each other out

Scissors

Skate at a slower-than-normal pace. Bring your right skate in a circular movement out to the right and in front of the other so that they are almost in line with each other (front to back as if you were on a balance beam) and your legs are barely crossed to accommodate that position. Repeat the movement with the left skate so that it ends up in front of the right and your legs are crossed the other way. Repeat this over and over so that your skates weave in and out as you go around the rink.

Try concentrating on quickness of move and dexterity required in not tripping yourself up.

Try concentrating on getting the lateral width wider and wider so that your skates pass being “in line” with each other and actually trade places.

Weaving with Cones/Obstacles

Use any of the above weaves, eggshells or scissor movements with the additional obstacle of cones.

Decrease space between cones to increase difficulty

Take the course backwards

Remember not to lift feet up

Race with another skater around the rink with cones marking out the course\

 

Last in line whips/weaving

This is good for agility and being comfortable skating near each other and touching each other. Line the girls up and have them stay an arms length apart. The girl in the back will make her way to the font of the line either by weaving through the girls or by getting various kinds of whips off of them. She will race with the girl in the front, who will become the girl doing the weaving. Make sure girls in line are skating with proper form, low and wide, and cheer their teammates on as they race.

 

Moving Balance Drills

One Leg Laps

Balance on one skate, and at a whistle, balance on one skate and keep moving. Propel yourself around the rink by the use of small weaving movements on that supporting foot. Don’t forget to try the other side.

Reverse the direction to clockwise – anything working your “bad” or “weaker” side is very helpful in improving your form, strength and balance.

For the very advanced, try skating backwards on one foot. Don’t forget to switch and work the other leg.

Skating Backwards

Eggshells –

Eggshells –

Use the fundamentals of forwards eggshells (figure 8s) to propel you backwards. Set and Pull –

Stand with your skates hip-width apart, but with your right skate about a foot in front of the other. Your weight is primarily on your left skate. Pull back your right skate and then transfer the weight to it. Repeat and start gliding backwards.Figure Eight Balance

Set up cones at roughly 10 ft apart. off onto one foot and work your way around the cones in a figure eight pattern. Use only that first push to get you around the entire 8 – minimize the number of times you lose your balance and need to put your other foot down. Don’t forget to work the other side. For the very advanced, try this drill backwards.

Crossovers

Standing Crossovers

With feet/skates wider than shoulder-width apart, start in a stationary small squat. Step one leg in front and across the other getting as much distance as possible between one foot and the other. A deeper knee bend will help get more distance. Then step out the other so that they are uncrossed again and back to the original position. Make sure weight is transferred very deliberately so that all 4 wheels of the crossing skate hit the ground at once. Cross the rink one way, then repeat in the opposite direction. Variations include:

Exaggerate weight transfer with a bouncing motion so head and torso bounce with each step

Eliminate upper body motion so all the focus is in the feet (as if a book was on your head)

Change up speed with whistle blows

Add rolling movement so that you are pulling the skates under you with each step

Grapevines

When bouting, you rarely get to choose which foot is going to go where if you get tripped up. Use this move to increase the ability to react quickly with different foot movements. Start with a normal Standing Crossover, taking into account all the notes from above. Do one step and reset, but when starting the second, step in back of the supporting leg. Alternate between front and back crossing. Cross the rink one way, then repeat in the opposite direction. Variations include:

Exaggerate weight transfer with a bouncing motion so head and torso bounce with each step

Eliminate upper body motion so all the focus is in the feet (as if a book was on your head)

Change up speed with whistle blows

Normal Skating Crossovers

As you are coming around the curve, push off with your right foot and transfer your weight to your left foot. As you glide on your left foot, cross your right foot over and in front of your left and transfer your weight back to your right and then reset for another one.

Remember there are 2 pushes in a crossover – one from the initial lift-off of the right foot (normal counter clockwise direction) and a toe-flick push from the left foot towards the outside. To get the most out of a crossover, make sure you are making the most of both pushes.

Add a leaping action when coming out of the turn to gain more speed – more like running instead of gliding.

Skate the track, using crossovers to cover as much side to side distance as possible – slalom the course using crossovers to cover ground

Try crossovers without lifting feet up off the floor

Corner Crossover Balancing

Skate the track and on one corner, lift up the outside leg straight out. Complete the turn on the inside (left) leg. Return to normal on the straightaway. On the next corner, start a crossover with your right leg, but don’t complete it. Complete the turn mid-crossover, balancing on the right leg and extending the left out behind/beside you.

Reverse the direction to clockwise and lift the outer feet and inner feet accordingly.

As you get more comfortable, increase the bend in the supporting leg, getting closer to the ground, and having to raise the lifted leg higher and straighter.

For the very advanced, try this drill skating backwards.

Alternating Crossover Steps

Do normal Crossovers as you round the track, but do not do any normal strides. Go from one crossover into the next, simply stepping in an X pattern as you skate. Get as much width between your feet as possible – deep knee bends will help.

Try this drill with a kick out to the side before crossing over. This variation can also be done standing and on dry land to increase balance.

Figure Eight Corners

Set up cones about 20 feet apart. Skate a figure eight around them, taking the turns with crossovers, but making them as tight as possible. Use the crossovers around the turns – not to gain speed on the straightaway between the cones. This should challenge the tightness of the turns, and work the sharpness of each crossover, hopefully minimizing slippage on the track.

Move cones closer together for a greater challenge.

Backwards Crossovers

An easy way to get use to these is to stand in one place. Pick your feet and kick your feet back (like a cat digging in kitty litter). You should start moving backwards similarly to the drag and pull method of backwards skating. Let the momentum of each step slowly grow as you get accustomed to it and then let it take you backwards around the corners.

Turning

180 Degree Turn – Front to Back

Skating at a neutral pace, place your right foot out in front and transfer your weight to it. Lift your left foot off the ground and place it behind your right with the toe facing backwards (your heels will be almost touching). In one movement as your right skate hits the ground, let your left skate come off the rink as you pick it up and turn it around so that it also faces the back.

Be sure to work both sides, turning to the right and the left

360 Degree Turn – Front to front

Follow the directions on how to turn from front to back. Once in the backwards-facing position, keep moving in the same direction (around the circle) as you were before. Transfer your weight to your right foot. Lift your left skate and pivot your foot all the way around to face the front. Once you have transferred your weight onto your left foot, pick your right up and place it next to the other. You will now be

Be sure to work both sides, turning to the right and the left

Advanced Variations

To challenge advanced skaters, add in the below modifications to keep everyone from becoming bored.

Jumping turns

Disco turns

Alternating Half Disco Turns

– alternating from back to front counter-clockwise to clockwise (as in 12:00 to 6:00 and back to 12:00) – a pivot-esque turn focusing weight on front then back wheels to propel you from back to front – adding length and/or heightBackwards Toe Stop

Follow the instructions on how to do the 180 degree turn. When you are gliding backwards, move your weight to the front of your skates and onto your toe stops until you come to a complete stop.

If you are having problems, remember not to lift your body up, but think about settling deeper into your knees to propel you forward. A common mistake is feeling like you have to jump up onto your toes, and that will just topple you over.

Whistle Turns

On different whistles, make the intended turn. Whistle at random intervals to simulate chaos similar to a game situation. Try the following the below guidelines for whistle blows:

One short whistle = ½ turn (so you are skating backwards)

Two short whistles = Full turn

One long whistle = ½ turn toe stop

 

 

Follow the leader

Break up into small groups. The girl in the front of the line will lead, whatever she does, the girls have to follow. Try and have someone with quick footwork lead each line so that the girls are being pushed to keep up with the line.

 

Quickness/Agility

Quick Steps

Tiny Steps

Quick Steps

Tiny Steps

Face both skates forward, shoulder width apart. Make very tiny steps forward, but do not let your skates roll at all. Increase speed when drill is easy.

Side Steps

Start at one side of the rink. You will be moving towards the longest end away from you. With your shoulders perpendicular to that end point, side step your way across the rink without rolling forward or back.

Side Step Ball Pass

Pair up, and grab a playground ball. Each couple has a ball. Face your partner and pass the ball back and forth to each other as you side step your way down the rink. This helps with concentration and communication.

o

 

Switch up between small quick steps and long, deliberate, non-rolling steps

Texas Two-Step

Gallop (skip) around the rink concentrating on making tiny fast steps. Do one lap leading with one leg, then the next lap leading with the other.

Variation: alternate right and left for one lap.

 

Circle speed drill

good at teaching efficient use of the track for jammers. Cut close in the turns and go wide of the straight aways to make the track as much of a circle as possible. Girls should be doing constant crossovers, never pushing straight.

Start the girls off at 70% of speed, pump it up to 80%, 90%, 100% sprint, recover back at 70%. Repeat. Half-way through the drill switch directions.

 

Jumping

Basic Two Leg Hop

Start in a stationary position on your skates. Hop up in the air, landing on both skates evenly. The trick is to pull your knees up to your torso – not to reach your torso up to the sky. Once you are comfortable doing this move standing still, add in a gentle roll and the below variations:

Quicker hops

Faster skating speed

Concentrate on length of ground covered

Concentrate on height of hop, incorporating cones of different sizes

Imagine a line on the ground in front of you (horizontally laid out in front of you) and aim to hop over it, working timing and quickness.

Imagine a line straight out in front of you (like painted lines in the street). Add in a lateral “swing” so that you are hopping from one side over to the other, landing on both skates each time.

Basic One Leg Leap

This is a basic jump handy for jumping over fallen skaters – leap out with one foot, landing one foot at a time. As you get more comfortable, add in the following variations:

Quick jumps

Faster skating speed

Concentrate on length of ground covered

Concentrate on height of hop, incorporating cones of different sizes

Change up layout of cones – ex: something similar to jumping through tires a la boot camp vs. jumping hurdles directly in front of each other.

 

Endurance

Endurance is not just about being able to skate hard for a long time. In derby, you must be able to switch between 100% and 0% for the length of the game. Therefore, you must train your body for short sprints, long sprints, long medium pace periods as well as general aerobic fitness. The more flexible your cardio system is, the better you will do on the rink.

Short Distance

Pyramid Sprints

Everyone skates around the track at her own pace. Once everyone is in a good rhythm work in a “pyramid” of increasing sprint intervals with the below (30 second increase/decrease) example in mind:

Rest –

Sprint

Sprint

Rest –

Sprint

Rest –

Sprint

Rest –

Sprint –

Rest –

…and so forth…

1:30 min1:30 min2 mins – 2 mins1:30 min – 1:30 min1 min – 1 min 30 seconds (push yourself very hard so that you are out of breath) 30 seconds (get heart rate way down in rest periods)Interval Sprints

For 15-20 minutes, new skaters start by going for 10 minutes, alternate between all basic skills by skating at a normal pace for 2 minutes than skate for two minutes and add in squats. Than sprint for one minute. Than do 1-2 minutes of scissors. Than sprint for 1 minute. Than do 1 minute of right leg scissors than sprint and than 1 minute of left leg scissors, than sprint for one minute. Other skills you can add in between sprints are balancing on one leg, one minute of using one leg on turns or on the straight away. Do not stop skating! All skaters must continue, no water breaks!

 

Hell

Skate for 10 minutes. Switch directions after 5 minutes. Skate as fast as you can. Don’t stop stroking. Count your strides and minimize them with each lap, making each push more effective. Count laps and try to increase laps with each practice. Get into a rhythm.

Races

Set up short, or longer distance races as a form of jammer endurance training. Time each girl and encourage them to go faster with each race.

 

 

Long Distance

Pacelines

All skaters form a line and start skating around the rink. The distance between skaters should be no more than about 4 feet. Maintain a steady quick, but not super hard, pace for a total of 20 mins. Variations include:

Back skater weaves to the front of the pack cycling through the whole line

Front skater (A) takes off, laps the pack to the front (passing the line on the outside) and races the next skater (B) in the front of the line. First to get to the back of the pack wins. Cycle repeats with skater B racing skater C – the next in line and so on.

Combine weave with the front to back race

Change direction and skate clockwise

Tighten up the line so that weaving is harder

Add in pushes, whips and other assists to help the person lapping the pack

Add in blocks to challenge the person lapping the pack

 

Speed Changeups

80% vs. 100% Changeup

On a whistle blow, alternate between skating at 80% and 100% of your capacity. Whistle should be blown at random lengths ranging from 3-45 seconds. Keep this drill going for 10 mins, have a short (2 min) water break, then repeat if possible.

Pack Rotation

Split the group into tight packs of 5-8 skaters, spaced out evenly around the track. Start skating, and on a whistle blow, the back of the pack sprints to the front. Once there, they must not over-shoot the pack. Keep the pack as tight as possible – always be able to touch the person next to you. The object is to be alert at all times, and be ready to turn on the turbo to help/hinder a jammer. Always be active – you never know when she could fall back and you can get another chance to knock her down. Variations include:

Add pushes, whips and other assists to sprinters

Add blocks to challenge sprinters

 

Combined Skill Endurance Drills

Whistle Falls/Sprints

Start the group skating around the rink at a good, but not overly difficult pace. On a whistle blow, everyone falls (changing up which falls they use), gets up and sprints to regain original speed. Don’t use hands to get up. Challenge skaters to additional falls every time a hand is used.

Use toe stops only for regaining speed

Use duck walk starts only for regaining speed

After fall, turn and sprint in the opposite direction

Suicide Sprints

Lay cones out at ¼, ½, ¾ of the rink. Line the group up on one side of the rink (divide up into multiple lines as size dictates). Skaters skate to the first cone and fall on that ¼ line. Get up, sprint to the starting line, fall, get up and sprint to the ½ line. Get up and sprit back to the starting line and so-forth.

Make it a relay race between groups of skaters

Add/subtract cones to work sprint/falls

Add amount of 1 completed suicide to 2 or 3 times all at once

 

Falls

One thing about falls – the fall is not over until you are up and moving again. Getting up from a fall is almost more important as how you fall. Doing repeated falling drills will build your cardio and the strength in your legs in addition to teaching your body to automatically fall safely during a game.

Do not put your hands on the floor to help yourself back up.

Basic Falls

One Knee Fall

Starting with a moderate skating speed, drop to one knee so that your kneepad cap slows you down (sometimes to a complete stop, sometimes not – depends what you want to work on). Make sure your upright knee does not hyperextend over your toes and remains as close to a 90 degree angle in relation to your thigh. Use your thigh muscles to stand up and keep skating.

Two Knee Fall

This fall is a little scary for most people, but it is usually the most useful when trying to stop at high speeds. Starting with a moderate skating speed, take a deep breath and thrust your pelvis and knees forward so that your kneepads hit the floor and you slide forward into a stop. Concentrate on leading with your pelvis instead of dropping down hard onto your kneecaps to avoid any spine or neck pain.

Four Point Fall

This fall is sometimes called the “baseball slide”. Starting with a moderate skating speed, go into a one knee fall (for explanation purposes, a right knee fall so you’re your right knee is on the floor and your left is up and bent). Once you have lowered yourself down onto one knee and are beginning to slow down, fold your right skate/calf/shin towards your left skate and sit back onto your right hip. Let your elbow and forearm take some of the weight as you kick your right foot/leg out in the direction you were sliding.

This sounds complicated, but a simple demonstration is usually all that is needed to get the idea. Photos to come soon.

 

Blocking

Blocking and contact drills should only be executed when you are truly confident in your skating abilities. At the very least, master falls and stops before entering into blocking drills with other girls or you could endanger yourself and others.

Blocking – Basic to Advanced

Booty Block

Get in front of the other skater, and get as low as possible. The object is to make your body take up as much room as possible. Pair up and trade off being the jammer and blockers. Start simple and move up to other variations including:

Use quick side to side eggshell weight transfers to fake out the jammer and keep her behind you at all costs.

Try not picking up your feet to minimize the risk of falling

Texas Two Step and Quick Steps to hop and skip around each other

Shoulder Block/Body Check

Skating side by side with the girl you want to block (it is illegal to block from behind) get low in your knees. When you see your chance, thrust your upper arm and shoulder (never your forearm) into the girl with an explosive check. Watch hockey games for good examples. The key is to know where your (and the other girl’s) center of gravity is.

Body/Continual Push

Like in the shoulder block, line up with the girl you want to check. Instead of hitting them with one pop of power, stick yourself to them like Velcro and push your weight into them so that they veer off into the audience or the infield.

Elbow Block

Most contact with elbows is illegal, however, you are allowed to use one effective variation. Start standing next to the girl you want to block, and then get slightly in front of her. Raise up your arm so that your upper arm is across her chest (never hit above shoulders or below hips). Pull your elbow straight back against her without movement up or down (jabbing). This move transfers all her momentum to you. It is also useful to do as a jammer to your other teammates if you need that extra push to get by.

 

Assists

Basic Whips

Classic Whip

Blockers or Pivots use either your left (inside) or right (outside) arm to help whip your jammer. A whip is when you use your own momentum to help your jammer through the pack at a faster pace. With a partner, take turns whipping each other the rink. Alternate positions of Blocker and Jammer with the Blocker ahead of the jammer and the jammer speeding up behind her to be given a whip.

Underhand Whip

This whip is used by extending your arm downwards while whipping the jammer.

Basic Push

Pushes

Pushee – Get in a low position with skates parallel. Pusher skates up behind her and takes her hips in her hands. The Pusher pulls the Pushee slightly back as a prep for the push. The Pusher takes aim and pushes straight out, making sure there is no up or down force or the girl will end up falling.

Group/Partner Assist Drills

Whippers/Whip-ees – Group Version

Divide the group into 2 sections. Half will give whips, half will take them as everyone skates around in a circle. This works focus as well as the physical move of giving/taking a whip. Identifying who is a whipper/jammer and being alert to different people widens perspective and gives you an idea of what is happening in the pack.

Work on communication between jammer and whipper – have lots of verbal commands and calling out for which whip they want

Change up jammers and whippers

Whippers/Whip-ees – Partner Version

Partner up and pick a whipper and jammer. Have them circle the track, always keeping an eye on each other. Do not loose visual contact, even when you are on opposite sides of the rink.

Work on communication between jammer and whipper – have lots of verbal commands and calling out for which whip they want

Change up jammers and whippers

 

Various Derby Skills

Jamming Drills

Skating the Track

Have everyone line up on the outside line of the track. While skating on the outside line use your right leg to give a strong push so that your entire momentum is towards the inner line of the track. When you reach the inside line of the track use your left leg to push off again to the outside line of the track. Repeat this for several minutes. This helps to work your balance and strengthen your leg muscles while using the agility of the entire track.

 

Passing the star

Girls break up into pairs and practice the jammer passing the star to the pivot. The jammer comes up on the outside, grabs the pivots hand and turns around so she is skating backwards. She takes off her jammer cap and joins her other hand with the pivot. She pulls the pivot and propels her forward, and the new jammer goes on her merry way. You may have to demonstrate this with girls who are struggling, or step through it slowly with them a few times.

 

Blocking Drills

Identifying Your Jammer

Pair up and use the width (shorter distance) of the rink. Have one skater (blocker) block the other skater (jammer) while skating the straightaway. This drill is used to have the blocker utililize her range of view of the jammer. While blocking she slowly turns her head to each side looking for the jammer. Generally a booty block is used at a slow steady pace and the jammer tries, but does not accomplish, making her way past the blocker. When the pair reach one side of the rink they switch positions. Also concentrate on staying in a low position used for blocking.

 

Pack Drills

Plow Stop

 

Good for newer blocking girls. Break up into groups of 10, and at each whistle blow, every player has to touch three other blockers in the pack. They have to stay as tight as possible, while going at a brisk pace.


Games

Blood and Thunder

All girls skate around the rink, starting at different random spots. After skating for two minutes or so, when you hear a whistle, use LEGAL blocks ONLY to try and take down every other girl. Mouth guards MUST be used during this drill. The last girl standing without being knocked down, wins. If new at this drill, start all the girls off skating together.

-When a girl falls, or is out, you may have her stay where she has fallen on the rink so other skaters still in the game have to make there way around the fallen skaters.

 

Queen of the Rink

A pack of 10-15 girls line up at the normal pack start line. Two additional girls are set up as jammers. This is a jam with no teams. The jammers are simply trying to legally make there way through the pack while the blockers block both jammers. This goes on for two minutes and than you rotate jammers.

Shark Tank

All the girls gather within a designated area (taped off portion or lines already marked out on the rink). One girl (or more, depending on size of group) is designated as “the shark”. She circles the “tank” blocking the remaining “fish”. All skaters must keep both skates on the ground at all times, and must stay within the boundaries. If the fish are knocked off balance so that one skate comes off the ground, or they are knocked outside the lines, they are “out”. The game continues until all but one player is eliminated. She then becomes the shark for the next round.

To accommodate different skill levels, split up into 2+ “tanks” placing girls with similar skills together.

Dodge Ball

The rink is divided in two halves. Skaters are assigned to sides. To start the game each team has 2+ playground balls. They throw the balls at their opposing players.

If a player is hit by a “fly ball”, before it hits the floor and after being thrown by a player on the opposing team that player is out.

If a player catches a “fly ball”, the thrower is out. ALSO: The other team returns an eliminated player to their team. Players come back into the game in the order they were eliminated.

A player who is hit in the head (if they did not duck) is not out. The thrower is out. If the player hit in the head did duck, there is no consequence.

A ball deflected by a held ball, whether caught or not, does not result in player elimination.

A ball rebounding off a wall, backboard etc. does not eliminate a player.

When all the players of one team have been eliminated, the other team wins that game.

If the game is not progressing to one team winning, a coach may whistle for all “jailed” girls to be back in the game for the sake of keeping everyone active and working in practice.

Capture the Flag

The rink is divided in two halves. Skaters are assigned to sides. Two flags (bandanas, towels or whatever) are placed in designated spots at either end of the rink. The object is to cross the line, grab the flag and make it back onto your side of the rink without being tagged. You are “safe” inside your half.

Usually a “flag keeper” is designated – she must keep 1ft. away from her flag (meaning she can’t stand or sit on it).

If you are tagged, you are eliminated and confined to a designated area on the “enemy’s” side of the rink until one of your teammates crosses the line and releases you (by tagging) to continue the game.

If the game is not progressing to one team winning, a coach may whistle for all “jailed” girls to be back in the game for the sake of keeping everyone active and working in practice.

Red Light Green Light

One person stands at one end of the rink, and the other skaters are lined up at the other. The “light” turns her back to the group. While her back is turned, skaters sprint towards her. When she says “red light”, she turns around to face the group, then calls out 1,2,3 and after 3, everyone should be frozen. If she sees anyone move, waiver or fall, they must go back to the starting line. Once a skater hits the far wall, she is the winner and the game is over.

Freeze Tag

Depending on the group size, designate 1-3 people to be “it”. When one of these girls tags you, you must freeze. Another skater must tag you to “unfreeze” you. The game is over when all non-it skaters are frozen.

Group Relays

Divide up into groups of 5-8 people, and start at one spot in the rink. Team 1 does one lap sprinting, and as the last person hits the starting line, Team 2 starts one lap and so on until all teams have done one lap. Then, Team one starts again with 2 laps and so forth. Repeat this until each team does 5 laps, and then pyramid back down. This drill works teamwork, league support and the race aspect helps challenge newer girls who might not know how fast they can actually go.

Obstacle Course Ideas

Obstacle courses are great for groups of girls with varying skill levels. All points can be modified to challenge every level of skater.

Slalom Cones

Falls in Designated Location

Within a square of cones, or a spot on the floor – switch up falls and sprint to another spot on the floor, incorporating a stop of some sort.

Tight Square Options

Set up a square with a cone at each corner.

Make a crossover at each corner, aiming to do a 90 degree turn with one crossover to make a perfect square.

Do various stops or turns at each corner.

Jumping

Set up various heights of cones for girls to jump over – aim for any of the following:

Height over cones

Length of stride

Jumping over backwards

Leaps

Hops

Multiple hops/jumps in a row

Limbo

Set up a bar or a line which girls must squat under

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skills Tests and Benchmarks

Speed

Five Lap Time Trials

Time how long it takes to get around the track 5 times, noting the splits per lap to figure out at what point the skater slows down.

Two Minute Distance

How many laps can you do in 2 minutes? Make sure to mark out the track with ½ and ¼ marks so you can record partial laps for future reference.

 

Stopping

On a Dime

Specify a spot on the floor where girls need to be totally stopped by – work plow, t-stop and toe stops

Timed Stop

At a whistle, girls must stop asap and not move until the whistle blows (similar to Red Light/Green Light).

 

Skills/Balance

Turns

Make sure a specified pace is determined – skaters must be able to do turns at a decent speed if they are going to be effective in a game

Falls

Make sure a specified pace is determined – falling skill is more than just taking a hit and not getting hurt. It is how fast you can get up and get back into the pack. This test works sprint starts (toe stop run, duck walk) as well as the safety aspect.

Texas Two Step/Leaping Around Rink

This drill makes it very clear how skilled the girl is at weight transfer, balance and what her quad/butt strength is.

Cone Weave

Time how long it takes to navigate cones in a line at a set distance to increase awareness of agility.

Suicides

Time how long it takes to navigate a set course of suicide laps.

 

Blocking

One on One

A team of 3+ ranks (on a 1-5 scale) the following skills:

Taking a hit

Giving a hit

Sample Practice Drill Lineups

Focus on Basic Skills

For beginners or those who wish to re-examine their fundamentals, these drill lineups will help skaters get back to basics and improve their form.

Lineup 1 – Basics

Starts (Toe Stop Runs/Power Pushoffs)

Stops (T, Plow, Toe)

Red Light/Green Light

Obstacle Course

Pack Skating

Lineup 2 – Balancing (A)

Balance/Tiny Steps

Falls

Crossovers (left and right)

Jumps and Hops

Whistle falls/sprints

Lineup 3 – Explosive Power

Crossovers/Skating the Track

Jumps

Blocks

Shark Tank

Lineup 4 – Beginning Endurance

Sprints (counter and clockwise)

Turns
Toestop turns

Whistle Turn Drills

Lineup 5 – Balance (B)

Suicides

Side Steps (without and/or with balls and partners)

Weaves/Eggshells around track
Freeze Tag

Lineup 5 – Assists and Teamwork

Pacelines

Whips and Pushes (via partners)

Capture the Flag
Blood and Thunder

 

Focus on Endurance, Quickness and Agility

The following drill lineups focus on transferring focus from the individual’s skills to what their strengths/weaknesses are in the pack, and then adding in other skills to work the skater’s multi-tasking skills. These lineups are suggestions for a 1.5-2 hour practice. Make sure there is adequate rest time – a one 2-5 min water break should be taken every half hour is suggested.

Lineup 1 – Foundations

Pyramid Sprints

Pacelines with or w/o slaloms, races, etc.

Suicides (individual or relay-style)

Group Sprint Relay

Lineup 2 – Challenge Each other (endurance and communication)

Whistle/Fall/Sprint (with turns or without)

80%/100% Speed Changeup
Sprint relays w/partner

Dodgeball

Lineup 3 – Strength

Squat/Sprint intervals

Jumping (length, height, width)

1 Leg laps
Land Drill Conditioning

Lineup 4 –Power

Interval sprints

Texas Two-Step

Pack Rotation
Relay obstacle course

Lineup 4 – Agility

Stepping Crossovers (no rolling)

Slalom relays
Toe stop/duck walk races
Jumping turns and tricks

Lineup 5 – Game Skills

Suicide relays

Sprint starts (1 lap races)

Booty Blocks (with partner)

Blood and Thunder

Lineup 6 – Alertness

Identifying your jammer

Closed eyes laps w/partner
Advanced whips (inside, underhand, etc)

Freeze Tag

Navigate a line of cones to take forwards

backwards

one footed

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